Apr 18, 2014
397 notes
keyframedaily:

Chris Marker's workbook for the creation of La Jetée (1962).

keyframedaily:

Chris Marker's workbook for the creation of La Jetée (1962).

(via bbook)

Mar 27, 2014
5 notes

(Source: idigfilm)

Mar 27, 2014
11,155 notes
humansofnewyork:

"I don’t understand my feelings. Sometimes I feel sad and I don’t know why. Then sometimes I feel silly, and I don’t know why either. Now I feel ‘wow,’ because this is my very first interview."

humansofnewyork:

"I don’t understand my feelings. Sometimes I feel sad and I don’t know why. Then sometimes I feel silly, and I don’t know why either. Now I feel ‘wow,’ because this is my very first interview."

Mar 25, 2014
980 notes

Yep. 

(Source: kittyypryde, via schneiderslist)

Mar 18, 2014
5,845 notes
Feb 19, 2014
15 notes
Feb 14, 2014
4,320 notes

(Source: theclotheshorse, via forestine)

Feb 12, 2014
1,908 notes
awesomepeoplehangingouttogether:

Lucille Ball and Eleanor Roosevelt

awesomepeoplehangingouttogether:

Lucille Ball and Eleanor Roosevelt

Feb 12, 2014
7 notes
queenslibrary:

“Let children read whatever they want and then talk about it with them. If parents and kids can talk together, we won’t have as much censorship because we won’t have as much fear.” Words of wisdom from one of our favorite Young Adult authors, Judy Blume, who is celebrating her 75th birthday today. Happy Birthday, Judy!

queenslibrary:

“Let children read whatever they want and then talk about it with them. If parents and kids can talk together, we won’t have as much censorship because we won’t have as much fear.” 

Words of wisdom from one of our favorite Young Adult authors, Judy Blumewho is celebrating her 75th birthday today. 

Happy Birthday, Judy!

Feb 10, 2014
1 note

I don’t have a clear, singular moment of coming to feminism, but I do remember the precise moment I decided I was not going to hate myself for being fat. I was in high school, and I saw my mother, who, by the way, is incredibly physically fit and a beautiful woman, reach for the peanut butter in the kitchen cabinet, a spoonful of which is one of her favorite treats. Instead of eating the spoonful of peanut butter she wanted, she put the jar back, then slapped herself in the face.

She didn’t know I was watching her; she wasn’t doing it for anyone else’s benefit. She was just punishing herself, in her own private hell, for wanting a spoonful of peanut butter. It was a scary thing for me to see. And it wasn’t the first time I’d seen something like that (nor would it be the last), but it was the time that it really struck me that I had to make a decision about how I wanted to feel about my body, and that I could make that decision. It wasn’t fated. I could choose.

Melissa McEwan

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